With the U.S. Presidential election now behind us, many Americans are justifiably curious about the future state of our healthcare system. In fact, we’ve been getting a lot of questions in our office about what the future holds with the new administration.

It’s first important to remember that the United States legislative process isn’t a decision made by one branch of the government. For instance, the President can’t simply choose to create – or repeal – any given law as he chooses.

Instead, it’s a process; and one that won’t happen overnight. There are, however, certain changes that could come to fruition. Here’s what the future of healthcare (could) look like with the new administration.

Any major repeal could cause instability for Obamacare.

One of the challenges with repealing a major statute like the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is undoing its complexity. Repealing just one piece could have major ramifications on the entire Act.

That’s why we’ll reiterate: we expect that any sort of change will take time. The administration will want to ensure that a repeal doesn’t create major holes within the current healthcare structure.

The Trump administration could create a reconciliation bill.

The Trump administration may not completely overhaul the ACA with a repeal. Instead they may attempt to restore a reconciliation bill (vetoed by Obama in early 2016) or create a similar bill. The original amendment would have effectively terminated much of the funding for Obamacare; so a similar bill may do the same.

Pre-existing conditions and Children covered until 26 still covered.

Post-election, Donald Trump said in an interview with “60 Minutes” that he supported employer group health plans requirement to offer to cover children until they are 26 years old. He also said he supported the prohibition on pre-existing condition exclusions.  Those two large pieces look to remain in-tact.

Medicaid is still a big question.

Medicaid expansion was a major undertaking with the creation of the ACA, to further assist low-income adults in 32 states across the country. The Trump administration has discussed, however, decreasing funding for Medicaid. In addition, any sort of repeal of the ACA may cause a number of Americans to become ineligible for Medicaid, as well as unable to afford healthcare.

ACA Reporting requirements.

Large employers, with employees of 50 or more, are looking forward to some possible relief on time consuming ACA reporting requirements.  Employers who purchase insurance for their employees currently need to report that they are meeting the requirements of healthcare reform and identifying eligible employees for required coverage. Businesses also need to report that they are offering insurance to all eligible employees.

Change won’t happen overnight.

The reality is that change – any change – to the ACA and healthcare, as we know it, will be a slow process. In other words, you won’t see a major shift in the healthcare plan you choose for 2017.


In short, there is currently a lot of speculation about what the future of healthcare could hold; we won’t know much until the Presidency has changed hands and changes begin to happen.

Remember we’re always here at get-benefits to help and answer any questions you have. Don’t hesitate to contact us and we will help guide you through the healthcare process.